Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Shattered Earth (Shamans & Shifters Space Opera, Book 3) by Jenny Schwartz

Release date: November 20, 2017
Subgenre: Science fiction romance, space opera

About Shattered Earth:

 

The scum of the galaxy are using Earth as a nuclear winter death camp. It outrages pirate captain Kohia Jekyll’s sense of justice. No one deserves to die agonizingly of radiation poisoning, especially not on the planet humanity had to evacuate seven generations ago. So Kohia intends to close the prison camp down.

She didn’t count on an infuriating shaman healer hitching a ride aboard her starship.

Nairo Bloodstone isn’t going to Earth to be a hero. He learned the hard way that when you’re a healer, doing your best for people is never enough. One miracle leads them to demand another and another. Heroes die exhausted and alone, and the galaxy continues with billions of people still clamoring for a miracle-worker to save them.

No, Nairo isn't going to Earth to be a hero. He intends to change what it means to be human.

"Shattered Earth" is a stand-alone novella in the Shamans & Shifters Space Opera series.

Excerpt:

 

“Kohia.”
Just her name, said in Nairo Bloodstone’s smooth voice, and the low simmer of arousal in Kohia heated to real wanting. Damn him.
Nairo was the second man forced on the Stealth, and the one she’d known she’d have no chance of refusing. He’d invited himself aboard when he’d heard of her mission. “The chance for me to study Earth’s sha energy flows will be invaluable to my research, especially with shifters present.”
The Conclave had immediately agreed to his request. Hell, they’d have agreed if he’d asked for a harem of hundreds and all the gold on Corsairs. And with Corsairs main industry being piracy, that was a lot of gold.
“Is that all your luggage?” Kohia looked at the duffel bag Nairo carried, then frowned at his nod. The duffel bag was no larger than Aaron’s crew satchel. Kohia wasn’t used to civilians being so restrained. Then again, Nairo was the definition of control—which strummed all of Kohia’s instincts in the naughtiest of ways. Down, girl.
She hadn’t realized that she’d moved to block his access to the Stealth until he halted in front of her. She was tall. He was taller. Nairo matched Aaron for height, although he lacked the Freel’s heavily muscled build. Instead, Nairo had a lean, athletic body that suggested speed and endurance.
He waited. Without a word, simply by being there, he challenged her authority. Or perhaps it was more personal. He unnerved her.
She was captain of the Stealth, but she couldn’t deny him the right to board. So she stepped to the side and gestured extravagantly. “Welcome aboard, Shaman Bloodstone.” Her formality mocked him.
“Please introduce me to your crew as Nairo. Titles aren’t important to me, Captain Jekyll.” She’d been “Kohia” to him a minute before. Now he turned her formality back on her.
She leaned into the cargo hold. “Hami!”
“You bellowed?” But it wasn’t Hami who answered her shout. The Stealth’s engineer, Augustus Clarke, emerged wiping his hands on a greasy cloth. “Hami’s getting the new guy settled.” Clarke measured Nairo with a glance, and apparently the shaman passed. “Heard you out here. Nairo, I’m Clarke, engineer, and the only reasonable person aboard the Stealth. I’ll show you to the guest cabin.”
Nairo returned the handshake and followed the engineer.
Both men ignored Kohia.
She snorted. She’d feared her crew wouldn’t share her reservations about the shaman. To the shifters of Corsairs, he was their Big Hope.
A few weeks ago, Kohia’s newly discovered shaman cousin, Jaya, had triggered a shift in a wolf shifter. Vulf Trent hadn’t turned into an ordinary wolf, but into an inorganic robot wolf.
None of the shifters minded that Vulf had turned into a robot wolf. They just envied that he could shift and let his animal run free.
Since humanity had been forced to evacuate Earth seven generations ago, shifters had found themselves unable to shift form. Losing access to their primal selves hurt their souls in a profound way. They couldn’t realize their full potential, couldn’t be all that they were meant to be. That loss had shaped how the shifter clans established themselves in the galaxy.


Amazon


About Jenny Schwartz:

Jenny Schwartz was born to write. Her high school yearbook even predicted she'd become an author! Whether it's paranormal romance, science fiction or any of the other genres she's written, Jenny's one non-negotiable point is that there's a happy ending to the story. Her own happy-ever-after involves living by the sea. Imagine it: walking from your home, down the beach path to dig your bare toes into the sand, while you watch whales swim past, and all with a mug of hot coffee in your hands. Heaven.

 


 

Monday, November 20, 2017

Where Nightmares Come From - The Art of Storytelling in the Horror Genre, edited by Joe Mynhardt and Eugene Johnson

Release date: November 17, 2017
Subgenre: Non-fiction anthology, Writing advice

About Where Nightmares Come From - The Art of Storytelling in the Horror Genre


WHERE NIGHTMARES COME FROM

THE ART OF STORYTELLING IN THE HORROR GENRE

Book one in Crystal Lake Publishing’s The Dream Weaver series, Where Nightmares Come From focuses on the art of storytelling in the Horror genre, taking an idea from conception to reality—whether you prefer short stories, novels, films, or comics.

Featuring in-depth articles and interviews by Joe R. Lansdale (Hap & Leonard series), Clive Barker (Books of Blood), John Connolly (Charlie Parker series), Ramsey Campbell, Stephen King (IT), Christopher Golden (Ararat), Charlaine Harris (Midnight, Texas), Jonathan Maberry (Joe Ledger series), Kevin J. Anderson (Tales of Dune), Craig Engler (Z Nation), and many more.

The full non-fiction anthology lineup includes:
  • Introduction by William F. Nolan
  • IT’S THE STORY TELLER by Joe R. Lansdale
  • A-Z OF HORROR of Clive Barker
  • WHY HORROR? by Mark Alan Miller
  • PIXELATED SHADOWS by Michael Paul Gonzalez
  • LIKE CURSES by Ray Garton
  • HOW TO GET YOUR SCARE ON by S.G. Browne
  • STORYTELLING TECHNIQUES by Richard Thomas
  • HORROR IS A STATE OF MIND by Tim Waggoner
  • BRINGING AN IDEA TO LIFE by Mercedes M. Yardley
  • THE PROCESS OF A TALE by Ramsey Campbell
  • GREAT HORROR IS SOMETHING ALIEN by Michael Bailey
  • A HORRIFICALLY HAPPY MEDIUM by Taylor Grant
  • INTERVIEW WITH JOHN CONNOLLY by Marie O’Regan
  • THE STORY OF A STORY by Mort Castle
  • WRITING ROUNDTABLE INTERVIEW with Christopher Golden, Kevin J. Anderson, and Silvia Moreno-Garcia
  • HOW I SPENT MY CHILDHOOD LOOKING FOR MONSTERS AND FOUND POETRY INSTEAD by Stephanie M. Wytovich
  • BITS AND PIECES INTERVIEW WITH JONATHAN MABERRY by Eugene Johnson
  • THE REEL CREEPS by Lisa Morton
  • THE MONSTER SQUAD by Jess Landry
  • WHAT SCARES YOU by Marv Wolfman
  • PLAYING IN SOMEONE ELSE’S HAUNTED HOUSE by Elizabeth Massie
  • CREATING MAGIC FROM A BLANK PIECE OF PAPER: Del Howison interviews Tom Holland, Amber Benson, Fred Dekker, and Kevin Tenney
  • Z NATION: HOW SYFY’S HIT SHOW CAME TO LIFE by Craig Engler
  • LIFE IMITATING ART IMITATING LIFE: FILM AND ITS INFLUENCE ON REALITY by Jason V Brock
  • WHERE NIGHTMARES COME FROM by Paul Moore
  • STEPHEN KING AND RICHARD CHIZMAR DISCUSS COLLABORATING by Bev Vincent
  • CHARLAINE HARRIS DISCUSSES STORYTELLING by Eugene Johnson
  • WHAT NOW? by John Palisano

This collection is perfect for…
  • writers of all genres
  • authors looking for motivation and/or inspiration
  • authors seeking guidance
  • struggling authors searching for career advice
  • authors interested in improving their craft
  • writers interested in comics
  • authors looking into screenwriting and films
  • horror fans in general
  • those looking to better understand the different story formats
  • authors planning on infiltrating a different field in horror writing
  • artists trying to establish a name brand
  • authors looking to get published

Come listen to the legends…

Cover design by Luke Spooner. Edited by Joe Mynhardt & Eugene Johnson.

Brought to you by Crystal Lake Publishing—Tales from the Darkest Depths.

 

Excerpt:

 

INTRODUCTION

The Spooky Arts




William F. Nolan



Dip into any section of this book and you will learn something.
High praise, but a true statement. There are many pieces one can delve into along the way, as this is not simply another “how-to” effort; the contents within range from inspiration and molding concepts, to the way revision impacts the final draft, to the reasons stories are changed for other media. While not an instruction manual per se, this volume does instruct; all one must do is be receptive to different ideas and points-of-view. In fact, any one of these essays or interviews will do the job: teach you how to create or adapt works professionally for print or multimedia, taking you inside the scary business of fashioning memorable tales, with an emphasis on stories of shock and terror. Your guides include, to name just a few of the 30-plus stellar talents in this comprehensive volume, the capable insights of Kevin J. Anderson (as part of a roundtable discussion), Elizabeth Massie (“Playing in Someone Else’s Haunted House”), Tim Waggoner (“Horror is a State of Mind”), and Mort Castle (“The Story of a Story”). Here, in these pages, you are made privy to the expert advice that only seasoned veterans can provide.
Open your mind to what they have to tell you as I lay out some of my personal favorites of the treats in store…
None other than the King himself—Stephen King, interviewed along with noted publisher/editor/writer Richard Chizmar—discusses the always tricky tight-rope act of collaboration. Having personally collaborated with George Clayton Johnson, Ray Bradbury, Richard Matheson, Jason V Brock, Charles Beaumont, and Ray Russell, I found the King/Chizmar exchange particularly fascinating.
The redoubtable Joe R. Lansdale talks about dreaming your way through a story in “It’s the Storyteller.” As he points out, it is the dreamer, not the dream, who captures the reader. When Joe is telling you a story you know you’re in Lansdale country. That brash Texas voice is always there, always compelling, often funny (Joe has a great sense of humor). Pure folk art.
And Ramsey Campbell’s on board! The always commanding literary lion of Liverpool weighs in with “The Process of a Tale” to offer you a guided tour through one of his moody pieces. From first sentence to last, he takes the reader through several drafts, giving us an inside look at the mechanics of a Campbell story. Here is a man who is at the keys each morning by six a.m., seven days a week. He loves to write, and it shows: A master sharing the secrets of his mastery. Pay attention!

 

Amazon | Goodreads | Facebook

 

About Joe Mynhardt:



Joe Mynhardt is a two-time Bram Stoker Award nominated South African publisher, non-fiction (and short story) editor, and online-business mentor.

Joe is the owner and CEO of Crystal Lake Publishing, which he founded in August, 2012. Since then he’s published and edited short stories, novellas, interviews and essays by the likes of Neil Gaiman, Clive Barker, Ramsey Campbell, Jack Ketchum, Jonathan Maberry, Graham Masterton, Adam Nevill, Lisa Morton, Elizabeth Massie, Joe McKinney, Joe R. Lansdale, Edward Lee, Paul Tremblay, Wes Craven, John Carpenter, George A. Romero, Mick Garris, and hundreds more.

Just like Crystal Lake Publishing, which strives to be a platform for launching author careers, Joe believes in reaching out to all authors, new and experienced, and being a beacon of friendship and guidance in the Dark Fiction field.

Joe’s influences stretch from Poe, Doyle, and Lovecraft to King, Connolly, and Gaiman. You can read more about Joe and Crystal Lake Publishing at www.crystallakepub.com or find him on Facebook.


 

 

Friday, November 17, 2017

Speculative Fiction Links of the Week for November 17, 2017


It's time again for our weekly round-up of interesting links about speculative fiction from around the web, this week with Star Trek Discovery, Thor: Ragnarok, Inhumans, Justice League, The Punisher, The Orville, Oathbringer, Artemis, sexual harrassment in the entertainment industry, black speculative fiction, a controversy surrounding Windycon as well as the usual mix of awards news, writing advice, interviews, reviews, awards news, con reports, crowdfunding campaigns, science articles and free online fiction. 

Speculative fiction in general:

Comments on Star Trek Discovery (and The Orville):
Comments on Thor Ragnarok:

Comments on Inhumans:

Comments on Justice League:

Comments on The Punisher:

Discussions of sexual harrassment in the entertainment industry:

 Awards:

Writing, publishing and promotion:

Interviews:

Reviews:

Crowdfunding:

Con reports:

Science and technology:

Free online fiction:

Odds and ends: